Mine Subsidence

Mine Subsidence

John Shively earned a Master of Science in civil engineering from the University of Illinois in 1981 where he studied mine subsidence as part of his graduate research work. Shively co-authored the Phase 2 Subsidence Study for a site in O’Fallon, Illinois in September 1980 for the site of a dramatic earth movement caused by the collapse of pillars at the mine level and punching through the underclay. Initial ground movements were 2.9 feet at the center of the ground depression. The picture inset shows the dip in US Highway 50 with the ponding of water in the ditch and in the farm field south of the highway. The Wilson and Coco homes on the north side of the highway were located on the edge of the depression and experienced substantial damage. Shively participated in documentation of the damage, installation of instrumentation to monitor continuing ground movements and data gathering. Shively was part of the Universities’ Mine Subsidence Rapid Response Team. The team was responsible for going to sites of suspected new mine subsidence events in the state of Illinois, documenting structure damage, placing instrumentation on structures to measure future ground movements, and determining whether the damage was caused by mine subsidence. John Shively has worked in southern Illinois and the St. Louis Metropolitan area for most of his career and consults on structures damaged by coal, clay and limestone mine subsidence.

US Hwy 50 O’Fallon IL

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